LP Magazine

MAY-JUN 2018

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

Issue link: http://digital.lpportal.com/i/978254

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continued from page 32 34 MAY–JUNE 2018 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM executive leadership team will do that for you. Lastly, it protects you and your team from possible staff reductions or job loss. EDITOR: That's tremendous advice, Dan. Let's turn our attention to the upcoming National Retail Federation's PROTECT conference in June. You serve as the council chair. What does that role encompass? FAKETTY : I don't think most people understand just how large the conference has become over the past fifteen years. It's the largest annual LP conference in North America with a solid track record for educational content. While at Harris Teeter and now here at Southeastern Grocers, I've been fortunate enough to receive the support of our CFO, whom I report to, who has allowed Southeastern Grocers to become an NRF member company. He has also been incredibly supportive as evident by him personally approving that I be able to take on the additional responsibility of NRF LP council chair. My role is to provide leadership, make recommendations on issues that may be impacting our industry, and, more than anything, support the seven different committees within the loss prevention council. The seven committees include awards and recognition, legislative, education and research, diversity, women in LP, the investigative network, and content planning. The last committee works closely with NRF and makes recommends on education content for the conference, location, and even making recommendations for keynote speakers. Throughout the year I am in touch with the vice chairs through meetings and conference calls where we discuss hot topics that are impacting our industry. I also support the committees to achieve their goals and objectives. All in all, it's a great group of executives doing great work for the industry—all of whom volunteer their time. I'm proud I can be part of it and flattered that our president and CFO support me in the role. EDITOR: Where is the conference this year, and do you have any presentations you are especially looking forward to? FAKETTY : The 2018 conference is at the Gaylord Texan Resort in Dallas on June 11 to 13. I'm very interested in hearing our keynote speaker, Marv Ellison, who started his career in loss prevention and is now chairman and CEO of JCPenney. He's speaking on "managing through change and adversity," which he's certainly been living in the department store world. With the recent impact of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, we felt strongly that we needed sessions on disaster recovery and crisis management. We have several speakers talking about how to build a disaster recovery program and others who will talk about how they specifically handled those recent natural disasters. We have presentations on cyber crime, which continues to be top of mind, not only with chief information officers but also in LP as it's typically a big responsibility in our world. There is also an interesting session called "Power Posse" with Melissa Mitchell on decoding nonverbal cues, which I'm really looking forward to. EDITOR: Dan, we've talked about a lot of different things today. Is there anything that you would like to say to conclude our interview? FAKETTY : There has been a lot of conversation over the past few years about loss prevention programs being downgraded or even eliminated, based on changes in retail. I don't believe that will be the case at all. If I could recommend anything to anyone in our business, it would be to look for nontraditional ways you or your department can enhance your company's profitability, even if that means taking on what you may feel is not in your job description. By taking on additional roles and measuring the impact consistently, you will put yourself and your department in good standing with your organization. There are some in our industry that shy away from this mindset, and I think that's unfortunate. While we will always be asked to show our impact on shrink, there is much more that we can do, and I feel we should embrace new roles and responsibilities, especially in this ever-changing retail environment. I think if more industry leaders thought this way, they could make an even larger impact in their companies' success. This is not a dying profession as some have told me; it's one that's continually evolving, and it's a very exciting time for loss prevention professionals, especially now. EDITOR: Well said, Dan. We look forward to seeing you in Dallas in June. INTERVIEW There has been a lot of conversation over the past few years about loss prevention programs being downgraded or even eliminated, based on changes in retail. I don't believe that will be the case at all. If I could recommend anything to anyone in our business, it would be to look for nontraditional ways you or your department can enhance your company's profitability, even if that means taking on what you may feel is not in your job description.

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