LP Magazine

MAY-JUN 2018

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

Issue link: http://digital.lpportal.com/i/978254

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 32 of 76

continued on page 34 32 MAY–JUNE 2018 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM INTERVIEW EDITOR: What accomplishment are you most proud of for yourself or your team? FAKETTY : I'd reference the success I've had at hiring some really good people and putting them in positions where they can be successful, either here or elsewhere. I've been extremely fortunate to have incredible teams throughout my career. Here are a few examples. Will England, who was my director of loss prevention, was recently promoted to vice president of LP for Weis Markets. A few weeks ago I learned that David Homolka, whom I hired and trained years ago at Shopko, moved from vice president of asset protection and human resource for Cabela's and accepted a position with Duluth Trading Company where he's now the VP of HR. Mike Limauro, who I had hired and trained at Super Kmart Centers, recently joined Whole Foods as senior director of asset protection. Candidly, there are people I work with here that have the potential to become vice presidents of asset protection at some point in their future. We have a really good team here, and I believe in promotion from within when we can. If you hire the right people and give them the resources to be successful, they will be. As much as I hate to see people leave, as long as they're bettering themselves, it's all good. EDITOR: Speaking of people, let's talk a little bit about the structure of your AP organization. If you would, summarize what your organization looks like. FAKETTY : I have a director of asset protection operations, who manages the field from a traditional asset protection and safety standpoint. Within that structure, he has four regional directors that report to him. Under the regional directors we have asset protection district managers, and they support a territory or group of stores. We align ourselves as best we can with our district operations managers. Our AP field team is responsible for executing all the strategies that are developed, and ultimately cascading it into stores. This group performs all the traditional AP roles including investigative work in the field. They also handle those seventy-four incident types that are identified and reported by our stores. Depending on the severity of the incident, they are our first responders. I also have a senior director of food safety and audit who is responsible for our food safety program. The field audit team reports in through this area. There is a senior manager of corporate safety, whose office is here in Jacksonville, and he has regional safety managers in the field. I have a senior manager of pharmacy oversight and AP analytics. She runs our AP analytics center and is responsible for pharmacy oversight, which, as mentioned, is an important part of our added responsibility here. There's also a business continuity manager and a senior manager of physical security, both of whom report directly to me. EDITOR: You've been an active leader in the LP industry apart from your contributions to your company. Looking at the industry as a whole, what are your observations about the evolution of LP executives? FAKETTY : First, while retail is changing at a dramatic pace, I wish there were more loss prevention executives changing with it. For whatever reason, we seem to hold on to our old-school thinking that the detection, apprehension, and prosecution of shoplifting suspects and associates involved in internal theft will hopefully keep us employed. Unfortunately, those that continue to follow that mindset and make it the staple of their entire programs I fear are missing out on opportunities to make their companies more profitable. Additionally, absent strong metrics that support an ROI model for an asset protection department, it's not if but when someone knocks on your door and asks, "What do you do for us?" This is especially true now due to mergers, acquisitions, replacement of CEOs, or when the dreaded consulting group is standing outside your office door. While not a popular position amongst my peers, I feel strongly that this is a contributor as to why some leaders in our industry have been replaced, asked to step down from their positions or, in some cases, causing entire asset protection departments to be eliminated. EDITOR: As you've discussed earlier, you obviously believe that LP executives should take on added roles in their companies. Why do you believe that? FAKETTY : I believe there are five reasons. First, I believe strongly that asset protection professionals can do it better. Second, done right, you will be able to produce a strong ROI, often with the same or perhaps even fewer resources. Third, you will add immediate credibility to your program and be looked upon as a problem solver. Fourth, you won't need to self-promote within your organization because your While retail is changing at a dramatic pace, I wish there were more loss prevention executives changing with it. For whatever reason, we seem to hold on to our old-school thinking that the detection, apprehension, and prosecution of shoplifting suspects and associates involved in internal theft will hopefully keep us employed.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of LP Magazine - MAY-JUN 2018