LP Magazine

MAY-JUN 2018

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

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INTERVIEW 28 MAY–JUNE 2018 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM EDITOR'S NOTE: Dan Faketty is vice president of asset protection for Southeastern Grocers based in Jacksonville, Florida. Prior to moving into a leadership role with Winn-Dixie in 2005, he was vice president of loss prevention at Harris Teeter, director of loss control for Super Kmart Centers, and regional LP manager at Shopko. Faketty is the current chair of the National Retail Federation loss prevention council where he has played an active role for the past fifteen years. EDITOR: Thank you, Dan, for speaking with us again. We last interviewed you in 2003 when you were head of LP at Harris Teeter. Fifteen years later you are with Southeastern Grocers. Tell our readers about your current company and its various brands. FAKETTY : Thanks, Jim. Southeastern Grocers currently operates under four different banners. There's Winn-Dixie, which is the largest. We also have the BI-LO, Harveys, and a new banner that we launched in June of 2016 called Fresco y Más, which means "fresh and more." Combined, we have 580 locations operating in seven Southeastern states. EDITOR: And as the vice president of asset protection, what are your current responsibilities? FAKETTY : In some respects, I have the traditional loss prevention responsibilities that center on shrink reduction, but the organization has also entrusted us with additional responsibilities that I like to call nontraditional roles. For example, we oversee all corporate safety programs, including accident prevention and investigations. The audit program also reports into asset protection, and we have a field team auditing stores and reporting out daily on results. Additionally, we're responsible for pharmacy oversight, which involves working closely with our pharmacy business partners to develop and implement targeted controls to ensure we're in regulatory compliance in order to prevent theft and diversion. This includes using powerful analytic tools that enable my team to monitor the shipping and dispensing activity for "problematic" drugs, such as opioids, and respond accordingly if we see overdispensing opportunities in stores or doctors who may be overprescribing. Asset protection also has recovery services, which predominately deals with the collection of bad checks and employee restitution. My peers often chuckle when I mention that and ask, "Who writes checks these days?" I can assure you they are alive and well in the supermarket industry. Rounding out the AP areas of responsibility are food safety and business continuity. When you look at things holistically, I think you'd agree that many are nontraditional roles from a loss prevention perspective. Ultimately, my primary responsibility is building the team, developing talent, working cross functionally with our business partners, and then developing and implementing strategies to help make us successful. EDITOR: All those areas have financial metric components that would help you measure where you're successful and what you need to improve upon. Is that correct? FAKETTY : I would agree. In fact, it's interesting because most of these responsibilities were not those we went after. Over time, it was key leaders in the executive suite that came to us and asked if we could help drive measurable results by assisting in the development of proactive programs designed to either enhance profitability in the business, minimize loss, minimize brand damage, or all three. EDITOR: While you've picked up responsibilities that many of your peers in food retailing, and many in traditional retailing, do not have. What are some of the challenges that are specific to your company or food retailing in general? FAKETTY : The competitive nature of the grocery industry presses our organization to continuously look for ways to work Over time, it was key leaders in the executive suite that came to us and asked if we could help drive measurable results by assisting in the development of proactive programs designed to either enhance profitability in the business, minimize loss, minimize brand damage, or all three.

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