LP Magazine

MAY-JUN 2018

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

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media such as websites, newsletters, and similar resources to educate themselves and stay current as loss prevention professionals. ■ A large majority (90%) also said they volunteer to get involved in tasks or special projects in the workplace. Mentors and Sponsors Effective leaders must possess integrity and humility, recognizing the importance of having others who can help them grow and develop. Our willingness to take advice and direction greatly impacts our ability to expand our talents and make a difference. By the same respect, a leader must be willing to help others to act, assuming the responsibility to nurture others in a way that will help them grow. We must seek out and accept mentors while also undertaking the guidance and responsibility of mentorship, assuming both roles with equal passion, enthusiasm, and accountability. Approximately 78 percent of participants indicated they have an individual who has served as a mentor during their careers, with 13 percent stating that their primary mentor is a woman, 30 percent a man, and 35 percent revealing they have had both male and female mentors. Highlighting a clear area of opportunity, approximately one in five indicated they do not feel they've had mentors who played significant roles in their careers. A sponsor is someone who can both advise you on your career and help to advance it. They promote, protect, prepare, and push you. Similarly, more than half of the women surveyed indicated they do not feel they've had sponsors who have played significant roles in their careers. Work-Life Balance There was a time not long ago when the boundaries between work life and home life were fairly clear. But the world has changed, and unfortunately for many of us, the lines that once defined those boundaries have blurred. As a result, finding common ground and a viable work-life balance has become more and more challenging. All of us must learn to manage our work-life balance better and more efficiently, finding harmony between our personal and professional responsibilities. Approximately 78 percent of participants responded that they are currently satisfied with their work-life balance at some level. Most of the comments focused on the demanding schedule, rigorous hours, and regular travel hours that they felt can lead to stress on occasion. On a positive note, an overwhelming majority (96%) felt that their families are supportive of their careers. Industry Support A large majority of respondents (89%) said they believe the industry has become more inclusive for women since they've joined the profession. While many felt the industry has made great strides, others believed there is still somewhat of a "glass ceiling," especially at the upper levels of management. Approximately 72 percent of respondents felt gender biases remain in the loss prevention industry today. Many of the comments throughout the survey referenced an ongoing "good old boys" network that they believed still exists. ■ On a scale of one (poor) to ten (excellent), respondents gave the industry an average score of approximately a seven in its treatment of women within the industry. ■ Respondents perceived the ability to influence change across the industry, overcoming misconceptions and stereotypes, inspiring others, and injecting a different approach and perspective as important aspects that women offer to the industry. ■ Looking at some of the greatest hurdles, the most common responses included work-life balance, self-confidence and self-advocacy, and the ongoing need for mentors and strong female leadership. Additional remarks included salary issues, sexism, overcoming stereotypes, and overall respect as a general theme. ■ Responses were mixed as to whether being a woman provided any particular advantage or disadvantage as an LP professional. Many indicated they didn't feel that women face hurdles any different than those that men face, with some further stressing the need to embrace our differences and have greater self-confidence. "We stand in our own way" was a repetitive theme. When looking at the perceptions and stereotypes that the women of LP feel they've had to overcome, many commented on the difficulties of leadership in a male-dominated profession, salary and promotional disparities, and stereotypes of women being "too soft," "too emotional," or "too sensitive." Additional remarks included issues with appearance, sexual harassment, and other inappropriate comments and behavior. When looking at the perceptions and stereotypes that the women of LP feel they've had to overcome, many commented on the difficulties of leadership in a male-dominated profession, salary and promotional disparities, and stereotypes of women being "too soft," "too emotional," or "too sensitive." Additional remarks included issues with appearance, sexual harassment, and other inappropriate comments and behavior. WOMEN OF LOSS PREVENTION 20 MAY–JUNE 2018 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM

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