LP Magazine

SEP-OCT 2017

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

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30 SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2017 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM SMART PEOPLE SAY SMART THINGS continued on page 32 Three long-time loss prevention industry veterans representing a retailer, a solutions provider, and an entrepreneur, from November–December 2014 R ETAILER: Another dynamic is how young people think about jobs differently today and have different motivations than we may have had years ago. You can't just say, "Well, they're not like me, so they can't be good." That's not true at all. You have to be open to that difference. Anybody who's in a senior position better pay attention, because this is the wave of the future. You have to keep up. SUPPLIER: One of the things that I would advise, as a mentor of salespeople, is to always understand and embrace who's coming up the food chain. The person you have a great relationship with is not always going to be there. When I talk to an LP executive, I always ask, "Who are your best people?" Then I try to build a relationship with their direct reports, their up-and-comers, because someday, I will probably be selling to one of them. ENTREPRENEUR: I think that it's critical to have a strong IT partner, just as it's critical to have a strong procurement partner. Because most of the things that are being installed and purchased today are connected to the internal networks, you have to have a strong IT partner who understands what it is you're trying to do and can support you in getting the solutions implemented. INTERVIEW ASSESSING TODAY'S LP INDUSTRY THREE VIEWPOINTS FROM A RETAILER, A SUPPLIER, AND AN ENTREPRENEUR By James Lee, LPC, Executive Editor RETAILER UPPLIER ENTREPRENEUR Rebecca "Becky" Halstead, retired US Army Brigadier General, from September–October 2014 HALSTEAD: The reason I say that we all have at least one person to lead and that's yourself is because I've run into a lot of people who say that leadership doesn't come naturally to them. They're not comfortable with it. I've always believed that that was a bit of a copout. I think that people fail to own their decisions and their choices and they just say, "I'm not a leader." But in reality, they are, because everyone has to lead themself. Most surveys say that the number one thing that people want to see in their leaders is integrity. That's true, but the only way to have integrity is to be disciplined, because it's too easy to not have integrity. It's too easy to take a shortcut. It's too easy to not quite tell the whole truth. Integrity can be inconvenient. It can be uncomfortable. But choosing this harder right is what we're supposed to do as leaders. I think that more of us should think about the legacy that we want to leave, and the legacy that we are leaving. Because I think what happens is it makes you start to think about your values, and whether your behaviors are reflecting those values. Because if they are, you're going to touch lives. And when you touch lives you're going to make a difference. That brings purpose to your life, and what greater position is there to be in than to have purpose? INTERVIEW THE FIRST PERSON YOU MUST LEAD IS YOU AN INTERVIEW WITH BRIGADIER GENERAL (RETIRED) BECKY HALSTEAD By James Lee, LPC, Executive Editor Rosamaria Sostilio, vice president of asset protection for Hudson's Bay Company, from May–June 2014 SOSTILIO: Diversity is defined in so many different ways. I like people with diverse backgrounds on my team. I have a woman on my team that runs investigations who is a former prosecutor. I have a woman on my team who is a CPA. I have a gentleman on my team who is getting his masters in technology. I try to bring in people with all different types of backgrounds. I can teach anyone the fundamentals of asset protection and how it fits into our team and into our company. That's easy for me to do. I've been doing it for twenty-five years. I want people who think differently than I think. I like to be challenged. I focus on diversity in thought, and that's very, very important. There are still challenges for women in asset protection. There are people who still don't want to take you seriously. That's something that I've always had to overcome. I dig my heels in deeper and just move forward. I don't focus on negativity. I surround myself with people who are positive. You need to have faith in yourself. INTERVIEW 25 YEARS AT SAKS FIFTH AVENUE THE EVOLUTION OF ROSAMARIA SOSTILIO By James Lee, LPC, Executive Editor

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