LP Magazine

JUL-AUG 2014

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

Issue link: http://digital.lpportal.com/i/352439

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 54 of 68

continued from page 52 ■ How should you respond if confronted by a police officer? ■ If asked to describe the shooter and the situation, what information would you provide? If you were to consider the layout of your store, the location of the store, the demographics of your typical customers, and the makeup of your employee teams, what additional questions should you ask? "Off the Shelf" Doesn't Work As we're all very well aware, retail is not a "one-size-fits-all" proposition, and that goes far beyond the size and shape of the store. When putting together the store, we have to consider the products that we sell and how the store needs to be put together, from how we deliver merchandise, how merchandise will be displayed, and how to best service our customers. We have to consider the market and demographics where the store is constructed. We look at the type of customers that our stores will attract. We have to determine the size of the staff, and how the staff will be best constructed to meet store and customer needs. We need to consider how to build our store management, as well as support teams and leadership both within the store and within our market areas…All of these factors, and many others, determine how the store will be put together, and how it will operate. There is no single retail model, because we sell different products and attract different customers. Why then would we assume that our active-shooter strategies should be bought off-the-shelf and applied universally? Of course, a single model won't collectively meet every need. The basics will apply and the concepts will be similar, but the application will differ slightly based on the dynamics of the store. Some stores may have a large support staff to include loss prevention, while others may only have a few employees running the entire store. Some stores may have vast areas to protect and multiple offices that are available, while others will have a small showroom and may not even have an office with a locking door. Incidents may not necessarily occur in a large department store. Incidents occur at grocery stores, convenience stores, and hardware stores. A recent incident at a Maryland mall occurred in a small surf shop with just a few employees. This only further emphasizes the need to construct a plan that best fits the store and the environment, and carrying out practical training exercises that will effectively protect our employees and our customers. Our model and strategy must fit our individual needs and teach our associates to appropriately respond based on the environment as well as the particular circumstances. See Something, Say Something "See Something, Say Something" is a good reminder and a positive message. It reminds us to keep our eyes open and to speak up when something appears odd or out of place. By the same respect, it's important to recognize what may be considered odd or out of place, and who should be told. "At Virginia Tech the shooter was seen chaining doors closed just days before the 2007 massacre took place," Hart recalls. "Those were actually his 'training runs.' Although witnesses later admitted thinking that the behavior and what they saw was odd, they didn't report it." Similarly, after other active-shooter incidents witnesses have told investigators, "The guy wearing the hockey mask in the mall was a little strange," and "The man wearing a heavy trench coat in an office building in June was weird," but they paid little attention to what they saw. Do people shop that way? Does their dress and behavior fit the situation? If not, say something. "Hear Something, Say Something" can be just as important. Hart cited the case of a car dealership manager that overheard a female employee tell a coworker, "If my ex comes into the showroom with a gun, you need to be my witness." The manager didn't act on the information. Later that very day the ex did enter the dealership, fatally shot the woman and the manager, and injured several others. ACTIVE SHOOTER "See Something, Say Something" is a good reminder and a positive message. It reminds us to keep our eyes open and to speak up when something appears odd or out of place. By the same respect, it's important to recognize what may be considered odd or out of place, and who should be told. ACTIVE SHOOTER RELATIONSHIP TO VICTIMS *Source: Active Shooter: Recommendations and Analysis for Risk Mitigation, New York Police Department A New York Police Department analysis showed that the majority of active-shooter attacks occurred when the perpetrator had either a professional or academic relationship with at least one of the victims. However, 22 percent of active-shooter attacks in the research data occurred when the shooter had no relationship to the victims. NONE 22% PROFESSIONAL 41% ACADEMIC 23% FAMILIAL 5% OTHER 9% 54 JULY - AUGUST 2014 | LPPORTAL.COM

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of LP Magazine - JUL-AUG 2014