LP Magazine

JUL-AUG 2014

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

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continued on page 32 EDITOR: Before I forget it, you mentioned your book. Tell us the name and where to get it. HAYES: The latest book is titled Retail Security and Loss Prevention, second edition, and it's available through Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and other sources. EDITOR: What's the mission of LPRC today, and how is it organized? HAYES: We now have approximately forty retail chains involved, and we want to help them move to more of an evidence-based model. We strive to bring them together and collaborate with us, using science to provide actionable results. I think the mechanisms for that are our various working groups or action teams. We call it "informed engagement." So, our two missions are informed engagement and actionable output. Think about having monthly conference calls with colleagues, brainstorming, and telling each other what they're doing, which is great. Now we have one or more of us scientists on the phone asking, "What do you want to know, and how would you use it?" We can then go and conduct surveys, focus groups, interview offenders, implement experiments, do statistical modeling; whatever is called for to give them something short and actionable—a one-page document with more detail if they want it. EDITOR: Give us a little more background on some of your working groups and action teams. HAYES: The video solution working group involves anything video imagery related. We have members who employ auto plate look up, facial recognition, and similar technology. We're doing all kinds of things with analytics both in the interior and exterior of the building. The data analytics working group is all about data modeling and understanding how to make the data work for us. While many retailers are now performing their own predictive models, we can vet them and help enhance the process. We have a supply chain protection working group. Every retailer has a supply chain, and that's a very active, productive working group. We also have an ORC working group. We're doing an industry survey tied in with Dick Hollinger, and then we're going to do some very specific offender interviews to help learn how to get better intelligence. The product protection working group is developing and testing better protective packaging, fixtures, and other merchandise-display solutions. The action teams are vertically aligned for groups with common issues and interests. For example, the drug action team includes Rite Aid, Walgreens, CVS, Kroger, Publix, BJ's, Walmart, Meijer, Target, Wegman's, Kmart, and others that manage food-and-drug issues. They may discuss pharmacy robbery, food protection, and other issues they want us to study. There are several other action teams, including department stores, auto parts, and so forth, looking at the shared issues that they face. EDITOR: Give us an example of one of your projects or research initiatives. HAYES: As I mentioned, my dad is a doctor. Let's say you walk into his office and your chief complaint is headaches. He's going to take your history, do an examination, and follow his diagnostic protocol. He then says, "I think you've got this problem, and this is probably why." He's followed his diagnostic process, which is evidence-based. There's some gut, it's still a lot of heart, but basically it's evidence-based. He'll then go through his options based on the available research evidence to determine the best course of action. That way he can make scientifically-informed decisions. In loss prevention we don't quite have that ability yet. There's nothing even remotely like that—no rigorous, diagnostic, and treatment option process. That's what our retailer members want. In many ways our projects and research should help us build that process. We conduct randomized trials, study trends and the available research literature, issue white papers, and take other steps. We've talked to customers to determine how LP actions or inactions affect the shopper and his or her perspective of the shopping experience. We pull all of the information together and say, "Here's what we know, and here are some best practices based on studies." We're still collectively losing billions of dollars a year as an industry, and while some individual companies are making Our two missions are informed engagement and actionable output. Think about having monthly conference calls with colleagues, brainstorming, and telling each other what they're doing. Now we have one or more scientists on the phone asking, "What do you want to know, and how would you use it?" We can then go and conduct surveys, focus groups, interview offenders, implement experiments, do statistical modeling; whatever is called for to give them something short and actionable—a one-page document with more detail if they want it. 30 JULY - AUGUST 2014 | LPPORTAL.COM INTERVIEW

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