LP Magazine

NOV-DEC 2018

LP magazine publishes articles for loss prevention, asset protection, and retail professionals covering shrinkage, investigations, shoplifting, internal theft, fraud, technology, best practices, and career development.

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GETTING TO KNOW YOU 30 NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2018 | LOSSPREVENTIONMEDIA.COM floor. Now that's easy to say but hard to do. MODERATOR: Cathy, you work for a longtime stalwart in our industry, Bob Oberosler. It is well known that you are his number one person and he trusts you implicitly. Talk about working with Bob and others who have influenced your career. LANGLEY: Working for Bob has been amazing. When he came to Rite Aid, he was very focused on leveraging data analytics and had a lot of great ideas. We were able to work together really well and move very quickly. In general, throughout my career, I've had leaders who have seen something in me before I've seen it in myself, and this is a trait I've always tried to emulate. To this day, I feel I am good at spotting talent. I've also been fortunate to have leaders who have rewarded me for doing more than what is expected. MODERATOR: How has that affected your management style, and what are some of your pet peeves that you find in people that you manage? LANGLEY: I'd say that I've grown more as a leader in the past ten years than I had in the previous twenty. I've become much more patient and transparent. There are still a few things that frustrate me, and one of them is when people are not willing to give it their all. I also struggle when people are not accepting of other's viewpoints. We're not all the same, but if we all join together and have the same mission, we can move forward in a much better way. MODERATOR: Mark, as I mentioned, you've been involved in several different genres of retailing from DIY to consumer electronics to department store. Now you're in the convenience world. What are some of the common traits that contribute to success across those categories? STINDE: I was fortunate enough for Jim and Jack to spend some time with me after about a year-and-a-half at 7-Eleven. I read an article that they published some years ago around the common denominators for successful loss prevention organizations. There were several tenets discussed. One was that data can help drive decisions. Second, a strategy that fits in the organization you came from may not fit in the organization you're going to. While components of it may, you can't just plug and play. Also, success almost always comes down to people. It's so much easier to get things done if you've got great people who are committed to the job. When you have people committed to what you're trying to get done, you're not trying to manage the nonsense with people who are not committed and standing in the way. I think that's key. Just as Mike said, you have to figure out what the organization is trying to get done and figure out the best way to support it. You can't be bigger than what the company strategy is. You must figure out how to work within it. And I've tried to apply that in every place that I've been. MODERATOR: Mark has already talked about getting his MBA. All three of you have LPC behind your names, and all of you are involved in the Loss "I'd say that I've grown more as a leader in the past ten years than I had in the previous twenty. I've become much more patient and transparent. There are still a few things that frustrate me, and one of them is when people are not willing to give it their all. I also struggle when people are not accepting of other's viewpoints." – Cathy Langley, Rite Aid

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